I’m Done with Super Smash Bros.

I’m done with Super Smash Bros. That’s it, I’m done with it.

Recently, during the presentation of Sephiroth’s inclusion into Super Smash Bros., they also revealed a host of new Mii Fighter costumes based on Square characters. Most were based on additional Final Fantasy VII characters (because no other Final Fantasy exists, apparently), but then they just had to go and do it… They brought back the Geno Mii Fighter costume.

Yes, despite being the most consistently requested character to join the Super Smash Bros. roster for about two decades now (who hasn’t yet made it), Super Mario RPG’s Geno is once again relegated to a Mii costume. It’s disheartening, to say the least.

Now, Geno is also the character I personally have most wanted to join Super Smash Bros. for quite some time now. However, it isn’t simply Geno being denied as a playable character (again) that has lead to my decision of leaving Super Smash Bros. behind me (though it’s a notable part), but the fact that Geno’s Mii costume status really hits the nail on the head towards something I’ve felt for quite a while now: Super Smash Bros. simply isn’t Super Smash Bros. anymore.

What I mean by that is that Super Smash Bros., at its core, is a Nintendo fighting game. An excuse to bring Mario and Pokemon and Zelda and Metroid together, and provide fanservice to Nintendo’s history. That eventually grew into the broader history of video games once Solid Snake (and later Sonic the Hedgehog) were added to Super Smash Bros. Brawl. But the series still retained its (for lack of a better word) “Nintendo-ness.”

It was really cool at first, to see Super Smash Bros. open its doors to characters outside of Nintendo’s own. The possibilities it opened up seemed staggering. Unfortunately, as time has passed, it’s become increasingly clear that Super Smash Bros’ scope of video game history and fanservice has shrank considerably. What seemed like limitless possibilities has unraveled to become narrower and narrower.

It seems every other Nintendo character that’s added into the mix is another Fire Emblem character (who, if it weren’t for their name plate, I couldn’t differentiate from Marth if I tried). And now, the third party characters are becoming more and more of the same type of character.

I can accept Sephiroth. I understand he’s popular, and I’ll take him over Sora any day. But the fact that Sephiroth is now a character after there have been a few dozen other anime swordfighter characters kind of makes his inclusion mean nothing. He’s just another one on the pile.

Super Smash Bros. is losing its “Nintendo-ness” and basically becoming just another anime fighter, of which there is no shortage of on the market. I mean, seriously, how many anime-looking guys with swords does Super Smash Bros. really need? And it’s funny how people who (inexplicably) defend Sakurai’s every last decision like to use “but there are a lot of Mario and Pokemon characters” as a rebuttal. Yeah, but the Mario and Pokemon characters are at least unique (with maybe one exception apiece). And given that they’re the two biggest video game franchises – Nintendo or otherwise – of all time, I’d say they’ve earned as many characters as they can have.

I mean, where does Fire Emblem place on the Nintendo ladder? Like, the fourth wrung, maybe? I’m not saying it’s bad, but it certainly hasn’t earned having more characters represented in Super Smash Bros. than, oh, I don’t know, THE LEGEND OF ZELDA! It would be like if you went to Disneyland, and instead of Mickey Mouse, Frozen and Lion King characters they had Treasure Planet everywhere. Treasure Planet isn’t bad, but it isn’t one of Disney’s more remembered features. You’d be like “what the hell?”

I know people would think this is just personal bias speaking. But hey, I absolutely love Pikmin, but I don’t think it needs another character in Super Smash Bros. Its representation seems to fit where the series places in Nintendo’s history. This isn’t about personal favorites, it’s about how Super Smash Bros. – a series built around fanservice of video game history – has narrowed down its fanservice to a very specific niche, and isn’t even doing a good job at catering to said niche, considering the variety of Fire Emblem characters they could have as opposed to the ones they’ve chosen (most of which are basically “Marth again”).

Why should Shovel Knight, Bomberman, Goemon, Sans and Isaac – characters who could bring so much variety to both gameplay and in representing video game history – be relegated to Assist Trophies or Mii costumes, while seemingly any blue-haired swordsman from Fire Emblem can make it as playable characters by default? Again, Sakurai’s questionably loyal fanbase always point out “it’s a Japanese game, of course there are anime-looking characters.” But my complaint isn’t that these “anime” characters are there, it’s that it’s always the same type of character being multiplied over and over again these days. Video games, especially Japanese video games, are incredibly versatile and diverse. But you’d never know it if modern Super Smash Bros. additions are what you’re going by.

Seriously, what the hell does Final Fantasy VII have to do with Nintendo? I mean, geez, couldn’t they have at least added Tera or Kefka? Y’know, someone from a Final Fantasy game that was actually on a Nintendo console? But no, here’s more Final Fantasy VII, because that’s the Final Fantasy that appeals to the very specific anime crowd Super Smash Bros. is now catering to.

Look, I don’t dislike anime. I get people riding me all the time about it. In fact I DO like anime. Sometimes even love it. My all-time favorite movie, and probably my biggest creative inspiration, is Spirited Away which, last I checked, qualifies as an anime. I greatly enjoy One Piece, have fond memories of Cowboy Bebop, and so on and so forth. Anime character designs aren’t the problem. But when I can basically sum up the majority of newer Smash Bros. characters as “an anime swordsman” it gets more than a little repetitive.

Anime, like anything else, has good and bad. Notice I haven’t mentioned the Dragon Quest “Hero” character being in Super Smash Bros. Because while he/they are very prominently anime, Akira Toriyama’s character designs stand out. I can distinguish his designs from a crowd. I can’t really say the same about the Fire Emblem characters or Tetsuya Nomura’s Final Fantasy character designs. We’re getting to a point where it feels like these characters are coming off a conveyor belt.

So again, Super Smash Bros. seems to be abandoning its broad fanservice and tributes to video game history and instead is turning into, well, pretty much any other fighting game because of it.

Yeah, Banjo-Kazooie’s inclusion was a beautiful, beautiful thing. The irony is, despite now being owned by Microsoft, that’s the only DLC character for Super Smash Bros. Ultimate thus far that actually feels like they belong in Super Smash Bros. (okay, I suppose Min-Min as well, but I think an ARMS character should have been added from the get-go, so her status as DLC still feels overdue).

It’s just not worth getting excited over a new Smash Bros. update anymore. I don’t find myself thinking “oh man, I wonder who the next character is going to be!” so much as “I wonder which anime swordfighter will be in next…” It no longer feels like the Nintendo fighter it once was. And wasn’t that the whole point of the series to begin with? With all due respect, if I want to play an anime-style fighting game, I’ll play pretty much any other fighting game. Again, it’s not these types of characters themselves that’s the problem, rather, that it seems like the series has a blatant favoritism for this type of character.

Why are the only fan requests making the roster these very specific types of anime-style characters? Why are so many potentially great additions shoehorned into Assist Trophy and Mii costume roles? It’s just not fun anymore. Maybe it is for fans of those anime-style games, and good for them. But it seems less and less diverse players are being considered when it comes to who gets listened to.

I remember how much fun it was waiting for Super Smash Bros. Brawl back in the day, checking its website regularly for updates, and being thrilled when they’d announce a King Dedede or a Diddy Kong or even an Ike (again, back then the series wasn’t oversaturated with such characters). Brawl seems retroactively looked as as the weakest entry in the Super Smash Bros. series (even though that distinction should belong to the N64 original), but damn, it knew how to make its character additions mean something.

Sure, Steve from Minecraft was a pleasant surprise (even if I don’t have any particular feelings towards Minecraft one way or another, seeing as I haven’t played it yet). But like Banjo, it feels like an isolated incident. Like “we’ll throw this crowd a bone as we prepare the next sword character.” I miss when every addition to Smash Bros. felt the way Banjo-Kazooie or Steve did. Looking forward to the next Smash Bros. character used to be a game in itself. Now, I basically have to look into what the newest Fire Emblem game is and I can guess who’s coming. And if not Fire Emblem, a character who looks like they were cut from the same clothe.

I love Super Smash Bros. More, I love what it is in concept. But that aforementioned “Nintendo-ness” just doesn’t feel present anymore. Even the story modes come across as kind of Kingdom Hearts-esque. I find myself – as a Nintendo fan – feeling left behind by the series. I mean, Sephiroth and Bayonetta can make the cut but not Dixie Kong? It feels so far removed from what Super Smash Bros. used to be at this point. I find that I just can’t get excited about it anymore. Yes, the series is still mechanically competent (I named Ultimate as my Game of the Year for 2018 because of its polished gameplay, though suffice to say I’ve been rethinking that decision for a while now), but its heart and soul feel different.

It’s not a hopeless situation. There are things the series could do to win me over again. But if it keeps going the way it’s going… *Shrug*

Maybe by the time Switch 2 comes out and Nintendo releases Super Smash Bros. 6 (or 7 or whatever, I still don’t know where the series stands with the 3DS/Wii U entries as different games), maybe then the series will go back to the versatility it once had. And maybe then the series will actually make Geno a playable character like fans have been asking for two decades now. But until then, I’m done with Super Smash Bros. I just can’t get excited about it anymore. Maybe some day I’ll make a revised “most wanted characters” list just for the giggles, but seeing as none of my most wanted characters are anime sword guys it’s not like they’d have a chance anyway.

Until Super Smash Bros. reclaims that “Nintendo-ness,” it’s kind of in a similar boat for me as Paper Mario at this point, in that I now get the same “if you’re going to outright give fans the middle finger, why should I care?” feeling from it. Nintendo killed Paper Mario by removing its depth, RPG elements and variety, and now they’ve done the same to Super Smash Bros. by turning a franchise that celebrates video game history into a franchise that panders more and more exclusively to a very specific audience. And if you don’t fit square-peg into that audience, you’re basically left in the cold.

Imagine if you and a group of friends exchanged gifts every year during the holidays. But then, all of a sudden, only one of those friends keeps getting all the gifts. Maybe another friend gets a little trinket or whatever on occasion, but only the one person is getting all the good stuff. That’s kind of what Super Smash Bros. feels like now. It stopped giving gifts to everyone, and decided to pick a favorite at the expense of everyone else.

The recent additions to Super Smash Bros. have left me wondering if I really care about Super Smash Bros. anymore. The reveal that Geno has been relegated to a Mii costume again made me come to a conclusion: I don’t.

Author: themancalledscott

Born of cold and winter air and mountain rain combining, the man called Scott is an ancient sorcerer from a long-forgotten realm. He’s more machine now than man, twisted and evil. Or, you know, he could just be some guy who loves video games, animations and cinema who just wanted to write about such things.

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