Second Thoughts

So I saw Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom for the second time last night, and I actually enjoyed it a lot more the second time around. Though most of my complaints still stand (the Indoraptor is not nearly as memorable of a movie monster as the Indominous Rex, too much of the film takes place in the Lockwood mansion, etc), I just thought it was a more fun film this second time around. Still not as good as the first Jurassic World, which is still one of my favorite popcorn movies of recent memory, but more enjoyable than I thought it was the first time around.

Of course, this has me considering if I should make some edits to my review of the film. Nothing major, mind you, but maybe enough to showcase my newer appreciation for the Jurassic World sequel. Normally, I hate changing my reviews (outside of correcting spelling and grammatical errors, and lord knows I have to go back and do that often), but it’s not like I’ve never done it before. Opinions do change, after all.

This also got me thinking of another 2018 movie I’ve been thinking differently about from when I first saw it, but in this case, for less positive reasons. This film is Deadpool 2, which I find myself liking less and less the more I think about it. Yes, I do think it was an improvement over the first Deadpool, and I think that it is decently well made for what it is. But the more I think about it, the more I wonder if I like what it is. I don’t hate it, but the whole self-referential/deprecating humor of movies has run its course in my book. In this internet age, when things are mocked for taking themselves seriously, entertainment and media has followed suit, insisting on mocking themselves to “stay cool with the kids,” as it were. This isn’t saying I have a problem with humor. A movie can still be a comedy or even a bit of a stupid entertainment, and still take itself seriously (perhaps “genuinely” is a more accurate word?).

But the more I think about it, the more I feel that all Deadpool is is self-referential jokes. There’s only so many winks and nudges I can take from a movie. And just because you make fun of yourself for following easy tropes doesn’t change the fact that you’re still following those tropes!

Okay, now I’m getting a bit sidetracked. I suppose I’ll save my rants on modern media’s insistence on self-parody just to appease the cynical internet age for another day. My point is that I initially awarded Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom a 6.5 out of 10, while I gave Deadpool 2 a 7.5. After consideration on Deadpool’s sequel and seeing the Jurassic World sequel a second viewing, I actually find myself wanting to flat-out reverse their scores. I haven’t quite decided on that just yet, so in the interim, I’ve altered both movie’s scores to 7.0s, until I can more strongly decide on whether or not to alter my reviews. Of course, some might say a second viewing of Deadpool 2 may be in order before making such a decision, but that’s just the thing. I don’t find myself particularly wanting to see Deadpool 2 again any time soon. Doesn’t that say something?

Does this dilemma of indecisiveness and possibly changing review scores make me a bad critic? Eh, maybe. But I’d also feel a bit lame if I felt my reviews no longer represented my opinions. Besides, it’s not like I’m altering something I thought was great and suddenly am claiming it to be terrible or vice versa or anything.

This whole ‘ordeal’ has opened up another can of worms, however, in that I’m once again considering changing my rating system from its current .5 state to a simpler whole number scale. With simple whole numbers, the possibility of altering a score just doesn’t seem quite as taboo. Then of course there’s my silly idea of the “mostly” whole number scale, in which it’s whole numbers, except the 9.5 score remains, both as a means to be a little cheeky and have some fun at the expense of people who are maybe a little too stingy with their scoring, while still being able to seriously retain the prestige of perfect and near-perfect scores. Because if my earlier sidetracked rant a few paragraphs earlier was any indication, I have a fondness for things that can balance sincerity and silliness.

Again, I’m sidetracked. Case in point: my complaints with Fallen Kingdom still stand, but I thought it was more fun the second time around, while Deadpool 2 seems less appealing with time, so I might change those scores. Hell, even Black Panther, one of the better movies this year which I scored an 8.5, is feeling more like an 8.0 to me. That is, if I keep that ‘.5’ differentiation at all.

So anyway, I thought I’d ask you, my beautiful, beautiful readers, your thoughts on the matter. Is altering scores and tweaking reviews too unprofessional? Or does the changing of opinions justify such actions, if even just on occasion? Am I a bad critic (even if I am, I’m gonna keep writing anyway. So that’s a moot point)? Feel free to leave your thoughts in the comments and whatnot.

Deadpool 2 Review

When Deadpool was released in 2016, it was a breath of fresh air for many. Not only did it take the super hero genre to R-rated territory, but it also emphasized humor to a much higher degree than the countless other super hero films on the market these days. Deadpool was a surprise hit, and a sequel was inevitable. Here we are with Deadpool 2, which outdoes its predecessor in most respects, though may not win over those who weren’t already Deadpool faithful.

While Deadpool told a straightforward origin/revenge story, Deadpool 2 ups the ante with stronger character arcs. Wade Wilson/Deadpool (Ryan Reynolds) has suffered a tragedy in his life, and is trying to find a greater purpose. He might just find it when he stumbles across a troubled teenage mutant named Russel Collins (Julian Dennison) – who likes to call himself Fire Fist – who is in need of a bit of guidance, not to mention protection once a hitman from the future named Cable (Josh Brolin) shows up with the intent of killing Collins.

Its plot may not reinvent the super hero genre, but it feels fresher and deeper than its predecessor, due in large part to the dynamics between the characters. Russel and Cable may seem like typical sidekick and antagonist archetypes at first glance, but as the film goes on they reveal that there’s more to their characters. And this only brings out the best in Deadpool as a character as well.

Deadpool 2 also benefits from being a funnier film than the first entry. The pop-culture references, meta-humor, and zippy one-liners are in full force here. Everything from fellow X-Men movies to the Marvel Cinematic Universe to DC’s less-than-stellar Expanded Universe to Disney’s Frozen gets name-dropped and/or lampooned throughout. The film even opens with a pretty funny visual gag at the expense of the ending of 2017’s Logan. And of course Deadpool 2 is more than happy to make fun of itself most of all, with the crimson hero often deriding his own script and studio whenever an obvious trope or storyline convenience shows up.

While the 2016 original had its charm due to its sense of humor, its story was nothing to write home about. What elevates Deadpool 2 above its predecessor is how it finds a better balance at telling a good story, while also being able to break the fourth wall and make a punchline of itself every other minute. The story may not reach the same heights as some of the more recent Marvel films such as Black Panther or Avengers: Infinity War, but its stronger emphasis on character arcs makes it a more memorable story to its predecessor, while not sacrificing the humor and wit that separates Deadpool from the armies of other super hero films of this day and age.

Unfortunately, Deadpool 2 still does suffer from a few of the problems that hindered the original. The action scenes can be either hit or miss, never quite deciding whether they want to be serious action sequences or parodies of them. Similarly, Deadpool 2 seems to have some inconsistent pacing, which admittedly has been a recurring issue with many of the films in the X-Men franchise. Certain characters, even important ones, seem largely forgotten for long stretches of time, and some of the plot revelations unfold somewhat unceremoniously. And although Deadpool 2 is an improvement over the first film, it may not be to quite the extent as to change the minds of anyone who somehow didn’t care for Deadpool’s antics the first time around.

What I’m getting at is, Deadpool 2 is very good, but just shy from greatness. There are moments of greatness here and there, particularly revolving around Reynolds’ and Brolin’s performances, as well as those aforementioned meta-gags. But in a time when super hero films (the Marvel ones, anyway) are reaching a newfound consistency in greatness, Deadpool 2 simply falls a bit short of some of its contemporaries. It may never be dull, but Deadpool 2 also simply doesn’t stack up to the recent MCU output.

If you enjoyed the first Deadpool, it only makes sense that you’d love Deadpool 2. It more or less takes the elements that single Deadpool out in the super hero genre (R-rated comedy, violence, etc.) and cranks them to the next level. If Deadpool can find a foundation that makes it feel more like some of the recent Marvel films and less like, well, the X-Men films, while still keeping its R-rated identity intact, it could be one of the best super hero franchises going (it may also benefit its studio to emphasize it over the X-Men films, which have become more than a little convoluted with their continuities and timelines, things which Deadpool can openly acknowledge and mock). As it stands, Deadpool will have to “settle” for being the funny man sitting on the shoulders of giants. Albeit he certainly would a lot of attention to that shoulder.

 

6

Deadpool

Deadpool

I just saw Deadpool, and though I haven’t yet had the time to fully analyze it and let my opinions fully bake, I figured I’d write how I feel about the movie now despite my opinions still being in dough form.

Overall I enjoyed Deadpool more than I thought I would. I’ve admittedly never been a fan of the Deadpool character, as I tend to not usually be a fan of overly sarcastic, self-referential characters (I like my stories genuine, even if they’re ridiculous). But Deadpool worked for the most part.

Ryan Reynolds’ performance was particularly memorable, as he pretty much nailed the character’s comedic and fourth wall-breaking elements perfectly, and also managed to delve into some more serious territory when necessary.

The portrayals of fellow X-Men characters Colossus and Negasonic Teenage Warhead were also enjoyable, as were the nods to the confusing continuities of the X-Men movies and this film’s relatively low budget when compared to them.

On the downside, Deadpool continues the recent trend of super hero movies of having a completely forgettable villain. The villain simply lacks presence, and in terms of super powers he doesn’t come off as a threat to Deadpool and company.

Though Deadpool starts things off with an interesting pace – beginning with a brutal action scene before going to the origin story and back again – it ultimately devolves into another predictable super hero origin story. By the end of things, it largely turns into one of the very movies it insistently mocks.

Overall, Deadpool was fun. It wasn’t great by any means, and I still can’t say I’m a fan of the Deadpool character as a whole, but the fact that I mostly enjoyed it despite my initial skepticisms is saying something.