Why Waluigi Could Have Worked in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate

I never thought I’d say this, but I’m actually a little disappointed that Waluigi is only an Assist Trophy and not a playable character in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate. Unlike a lot of people, I wasn’t rooting for Waluigi to make the roster due to his nature as a meme these days. In fact, I never thought of him as a worthy inclusion as a playable character on the Smash Bros. roster until after Ultimate was revealed. He still wouldn’t be one of my most wanted characters, mind you, but after some consideration, I can’t help but feel Waluigi is being treated rather poorly (at least, when we consider certain circumstances).

Now, some people complain that there are “too many” Mario characters in Super Smash Bros. But that’s nonsense. Exceptionalist that I am, I think the most accomplished series deserve the most characters, and seeing as Super Mario is Nintendo’s most accomplished series, it can have however many characters it damn well wants. Zelda and Pokemon have achieved similar success, and would be the two other series that could potentially keep adding characters and I don’t think anyone could make an actual argument against it, though I understand that Zelda has less notable characters to work with than Mario or Pokemon.

My point is that Waluigi was not someone I considered to be a worthy character to be playable in Super Smash Bros., seeing as he only exists for the purpose of giving Wario a tennis partner, and he only ever appears in the Mario sports games and Mario Kart as kind of a filler character, leaving no real impact on the series other than to be the butt of jokes.

But then, Super Smash Bros. Ultimate revealed Princess Daisy – a Mario character who is basically a filler character in Mario sports titles and Mario Kart who has left no real impact on the series – as a playable fighter in the upcoming Switch release. If she can make the cut, why not Waluigi?

In fact, I can think of two (somewhat connected) reasons why Waluigi actually makes more sense than Daisy. The first is that Daisy, being a clone (I refuse to call them Echo Fighters from here on out), doesn’t bring anything new to the table. I know, apologists like to claim that the clones “don’t take too much data to make and don’t get in the way of other fighters,” but they’re still just lazy, copied-and-pasted additions that don’t add anything to the game. I’d rather see less characters and have them all be distinct, than see the number of characters rack up simply because the developers were able to copy enough existing characters. Waluigi wouldn’t have to be a clone though (I guess Daisy didn’t have to be one either, but here we are). Considering Wario’s moves are primarily built around WarioWare – a series which Waluigi has no involvement in – it’s easy to separate Waluigi from the Wario that’s already present in Smash Bros.

This leads me to the other reason why Waluigi would be a decent(ish) inclusion compared to Daisy: his differences from Wario – and subsequently, the less likelihood of him being a clone – could mean drawing on different inspirations for a unique moveset, which could then lead them to draw from the Mario sports games themselves.

Why would this mean anything? Well, because the Mario sports games have no representation within Smash Bros’ character roster, and while it’s a series that may not need representation, the Mario sports titles have been around long enough and have had enough entries that it doesn’t seem undeserved to have a single character represent it.

I know, people could again argue that he’s “another” Mario character (but again, it’s a series that’s earned it), but the thing is the Mario series isn’t a singular series, but a franchise that encompasses various series within different genres, with the Mario sports titles being among the only Mario series not represented in Super Smash Bros. People could also argue that Daisy does represent just that (again, the sports titles are basically where she shows up), but because she’s a clone of Peach, Smash Bros. missed the boat on that one. Waluigi more easily avoids the clone possibility, and could have been given a Mario sports titles their Smash representation.

Think about it, moves based around tennis, golf, baseball, basketball, go karting, hell, maybe they could even throw in some kind of Mario Party inspiration in there. If Waluigi were even considered for Smash, that is.

Waluigi’s exclusion from the playable roster isn’t a major loss for Super Smash Bros. Like I said, I never even thought about him being a worthwhile character for the series until after Daisy’s reveal. But once Daisy was revealed to be just another clone, while Waluigi remains an Assist Trophy, it made me realize that, if Sakurai and company were willing to bring in C-tier Mario characters, they missed a little opportunity here for a more unique character, and an aspect of Nintendo’s biggest franchise that has yet to get acknowledge in Super Smash Bros.

Also, WAAAAAAAAH!

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Reflecting on my Time at E3 2018

“Is that the real Master Sword that Link actually used in the game?!”

Another E3 has come and gone. Although this was far from my first time at the event, it was only my second time attending since I launched Wizard Dojo, which in a weird way feels like a whole different era for me (even though it’s just a wee blog). Though the fact that E3 has had a bigger attendance than ever the past two years means that the lines to actually play the games can be, well, downright evil in their tests of patience, it was overall a very fun show.

There’s plenty to be said about the mostly disappointing presentations. Whether it was Sony’s unusual format of changing revenues and taking noticeably long breaks, or Nintendo’s maybe-too-focused-on-Smash Bros.-Direct, there weren’t a whole lot of surprises, or even as much of a lineup as last year’s show.

With all that said, however, there was still plenty to enjoy. Especially for someone like me who’s just lucky to be able to attend E3’s show floor. I’ve already written some blogs dedicated to some of the games shown at E3, but now let me write just a little bit about my own experience.

“The world’s greatest necktie.”

Naturally, the first day for me was all about Super Smash Bros. (though I also played it the latter two days as well). Though the gameplay is familiar to the Wii U version, it feels like it’s getting the right level of polish, aiming for something of a combination of Melee and the Wii U game to make the definitive version of Super Smash Bros. Though I still have some reservations (please, don’t waste whatever new characters we get with clones!), Super Smash Bros. is one of the few games where I always get sucked into the hype before release. Since the demo didn’t have my main man King Dedede playable, I spent most rounds as Bowser (who is actually my favorite Nintendo character, so wouldn’t that make him my main man?), or Donkey Kong and Mega Man. I won more than I lost *brag brag* but I admit I made more than a little bit of an oopsie when I went into sudden death as Ridley (I’ll really have to practice that up-special of his). Anyway, I’m just really keeping my fingers crossed that Geno actually makes it in this time. Hey, Sakurai’s behind the idea, if only Nintendo can twist Square’s arm…

Other notable titles I played over the three day event were Marvel’s Spider-Man (which I wish had a more unique title) and Mega Man 11. Other titles that caught my eye but weren’t playable (at least not from what I could tell) were Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice and Dreams, the former of which comes from Hidetaka “Prepare to Die” Miyazaki, and the latter by Media Molecule, the creators of LittleBigPlanet who really look like they’ve upped their game.

Spider-Man’s greatest joy was simply how much it makes you feel like Spider-Man when playing it. I spent more of my time in the demo trying to find and ascend the tallest building than I did with any of the objectives. Mega Man 11, meanwhile, felt like the proper continuation of the beloved series that it should be. Mega Man 11 boasted the usual Mega Man gameplay, but with the added bonus of some fun twists on the level design.

Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice already looks like it could be one of my favorite games of next year. It’s interesting to see a game that follows suit with Miyazaki’s Dark Souls/Bloodborne series, but that omits the RPG elements, instead opting for action/adventure. The only downside is no multiplayer, which admittedly feels like a step back from the genius twists to co-operative and competitive multiplayer the Souls series brought to gaming. As for Dreams, well, it looks like the ultimate game-making game, with players seemingly able to make every single asset of a game (including genre, characters, environments, sounds, music, etc.). Let’s just hope the in-game gameplay doesn’t suffer as LittleBigPlanet did.

Other games I managed to play on the show floor include Team Sonic Racing, a new Senran Kagura title for PS4, Mario Tennis Aces, and Fortnite (which, believe it or not, was actually my first time playing Fortnite). Team Sonic Racing felt like a fun successor to the Sonic & Sega All-Stars Racing series, though the removal of non-Sonic Sega characters actually seems like a step back (after all, Mario Kart eventually added Zelda and Animal Crossing characters into the mix. It didn’t start with them then take them away). Senran Kagura is…well, it is what it is: a mindless but fun guilty pleasure. Mario Tennis Aces actually surprised me with how much fun I had in my short time with it. I mean, playing as a Chain Chomp with a tennis racket in its mouth? How can it not be great? And although I sucked in the round of Fortnite I played, I can definitely see the appeal, seeing as it feels like PUBG, but with an actual personality and additional elements like crafting. Plus, Fortnite is now free on Switch, so I have no excuse not to get it.

Sadly, I never got the chance to play Let’s Go Pikachu/Eevee, because the lines were always too damn long. Same goes for Kingdom Hearts 3. But hey, I’ll probably play them eventually. Besides, I got to meet the REAL Pikachu and Eevee in person! That counts for like, 10 demos of the games.

“Squad Goals.”

Being able to play all these games was great of course (even if the lines could be insufferable), but just the experience of being at E3 is fun in itself for someone like me. Basically, it’s like Disneyland: wait in monotonous lines most the day, get rewarded with a few moments of quality entertainment, and overall you just enjoy being there. The experience was made all the better, however, by little things like conversing with other people with similar interests while I waited in those aforementioned lines (one particularly interesting individual in line for Smash Bros. also wanted Geno to make the roster), seeing a Solaire cosplayer fat-roll his way through the exhibit hall, walking right passed The New Day and getting a photo with Charles Martinez!

“It’s-a him!”

Yes, another E3 has come and gone, and while most will be discussing the big, news-y aspects of the event, for me, it was just  blast being there, and am itching to return next year.

Early Thoughts (and Concerns) on Super Smash Bros. Ultimate

The Switch’s iteration of Super Smash Bros. has been revealed as Super Smash Bros. Ultimate! So far, from what I’ve seen and the little I’ve played, it seems like a refinement of the franchise. It’s faster paced like Melee, but looks to incorporate the sense of balance from the Wii U version. Despite Nintendo’s overall lackluster E3 Direct, Super Smash Bros. Ultimate looks to please its loyal fanbase, and then some.

However, even though Ultimate looks like it could be the definitive Super Smash Bros. game, I do have a few reservations about it. Primarily, it may seem awesome on one hand that the game will feature every character who has ever been in Super Smash Bros. history – from the N64 originals to the one-timers from Melee and Brawl to the DLC characters from Smash Bros. on Wii U – on the other hand, series director Masahiro Sakurai said they planned to emphasize the inclusion of every past character, so to “not expect too many new additions.”

But is that really what anyone wanted? Sure, Ice Climbers and Solid Snake had plenty of support to make a return, but did anyone really want characters like Pichu and Wolf O’Donell to make a comeback? Don’t we have enough clones as it is?

Speaking of clones, that brings us to another source of concern: Sakurai has given clone characters the official name of “Echo Fighters.” The problem with this is that the fact that clones nw have an official label could imply that Ultimate is doubling down on clone characters.

I know, a lot of people like to claim that “clone characters don’t take up much data, and so they aren’t getting in the way of anyone else.” Maybe, but if you ask me, I’d rather see a smaller roster with unique characters than a large roster filled with half-assed, copied-and-pasted clones.

The reason why I’m concerned about this (other than the fact that the clone characters are already just lazy additions) is that, with the Inklings from Splatoon and Metroid’s Ridley being the only completely new characters announced for the new game, along with the grim promise that there won’t be too many new additions, this could mean that most of the potential new characters could just be clones. And who the hell wants that?

Things get worse, however, with the revelation of the first new “Echo Fighter” in Super Smash Bros. Ultimate is none other than (oh lord, give me strength)… Princess Daisy.

Ouch! It hurts just to type that.

Look, I understand that Ridley was one of the most requested characters for years, and Splatoon is Nintendo’s biggest new franchise, but Daisy? I don’t know, seems like we’re scraping the bottom of the barrel here. And yeah yeah, once again “clones don’t use up a lot of data,” but when they start stacking up clone after clone, the roster just feels watered down.

Now, part of me isn’t too disheartened with the idea of only a handful of new characters (I remember when Melee first showed off Bowser, Peach, Zelda and Ice Climbers as new additions, and I didn’t mind it when I thought they were the only new additions to Melee). But, if we do see only a handful of new characters, and most of them are just going to be clones, it would feel like a waste. And don’t even get me started on Bomberman being relegated to an Assist Trophy while Princess Daisy makes the roster. That’s just insulting.

I hope I don’t sound overly negative, because I love Super Smash Bros., and from what I played of Ultimate at E3, it looks to be excellent. But while it looks like Super Smash Bros. Ultimate may refine the series’ mechanics and competitive nature, it runs the risk of diluting the experience with an overtrumped roster largely comprised of characters who lack uniqueness. I mean, this is a series built on Nintendo’s illustrious history and peerless catalogue of video game icons. I’d hate to see it simply decide to settle on the quick and easy alternatives in place of meaningful additions.

Sakurai is known for asking his fans to “just be happy.” But if we’re getting a bunch of throwbacks and cookie cutter additions at the expense of worthwhile newcomers, it makes it kind of difficult.

“The physical incarnation of “we’re all out of ideas.””

But seriously, just give me Geno and Dixie Kong and I’ll take it all back and love it 100% LOL.